Saturday, 16 June 2018

An Overview of Daerthropes (Part One)

This post is intended to provides high level documentation of information regarding daerthropes.

  1. Daerthropes are a class of activants - something that causes a change within an embropheme.
  2. Daerthropes have numerous properties which have a bearing on their functionality and their range of influence.
  3.  One such property is the globic property, also known as the caenic property. There are three mutually exclusive globic properties as follows.

    (a) An autoglobic (autocaenic) daerthrope is capable of traversing the globinscular region unaided.
    (b) A phlabaglobic (phlabacaenic) daerthrope requires a phlaba to transport it about the globinscular region. A phlabum (also known as a daerphore) is a namli (small embropheme) that is dedicated to this task.
    (c) An aglobic (negacaenic) daerthrope is incapable of entering the globinscular region so must remain in the embropheme in which they are located.
  4. Some daerthropes neeed to physically contact their destination embropheme(s) in order for the associated reaction to take place.
  5. Some daerthropes only need to have a particular quota within the globinscular region for the target embrophemes to react to their presence. No physical contact need take place. These are sarpoidal daerthropes.
  6. Globinscular Density is the proportion of a particular daerthrope within the globinscujlar region. The amount of a particular daerthrope as a fraction of all daerthropes within the region. This is symbolically shown as γ(x) where x is a unique symbol representing the daerthrope under consideration.
  7. Quotal daerthropes is a term sometimes used for particular daerthrope that needs to fill a quota. Such daerthropes only register a presence in the globinscular region over a prescribed interval. These are usually ones which are issued by a particular embropheme, continuing until a fixed amount has been issued (prior to this, the globinscular density will be zero). The target embropheme(s) will then accept the quotal daerthrope until the globinscular density is again zero. This implies that the target embropheme(s) need a fixed quota of that daerthrope in order for a reaction to occur.
  8. Some phlabaglobic daerthropes do not register a presence within the globinscular region. The common explanation is that the phlaba isolate the daerthrope the carry until they relese the activant into the target embropheme. The umicrophene is such a phlabum. This property of the phlabum differentiates it from the generalised phlaba (gephs) as issued by the neulones.
  9. Some daerthropes are categorised by the daerthropic elements (dels) that define their structure. Once such example is the class of daerthropes known as tridelics. Three types of dels are combines in different ways to form different tridelic daerthropes. The elements comprising such daerthropes are given the designation h-type, r-type and y-type - the daerthrope being referred to by the numerical amount of each element. For example, T241 is a tridelic daerthrope with 2 h-types, 4 r-types and 1 y-type dels.
  10. Tridelic daerthropes with less than 4 h-types, less than 4 r-types and less than 4 y-types need to be carried by umicrophenes. In other words, they are classed amongst the phlabaglobic daerthropes. If any del is ranked 4 or more, then the daerthrope is autoglobic. The interaction between a number of these tridelic daerthropes is almost an eliset by itself, so will not be detailed here.
  11. Daerthropes can contain a number of Base Activant Settings. Some of these have been mentioned in previous Notes. In particular, please refer to the discussion of Enumerated Similarity States and their Index Values (ESSIV) - that is, the concepts of uniessivity, diessivity, triessivity, quessivity and quinessivity.

Tuesday, 21 March 2017

The Globinscular Region

The globinscular region is a diffusional matrix that separates most of the embrophemes within a fendument. A number of embrophemes move through the globinscular region, and the effect of daerthropes is communicated through this region. As such, this region is very important.

You may occasionally find that embrophemes within the globinscular region are referred to as grellitrae.

The proportional amount of a particular daerthrope within the globinscular region is referred to as the globinscular density of that daerthrope, and is written as γ(symbol representing daerthrope), e.g. γ(e).

Although it is true to assume that a particular daerthrope would be more prevalent in certain parts of the fendument, it is a feature of the globinscular region that a change to the globinscular density of a given daerthrope is felt globally. For example, when the amount of eolim produced by the Neerg Ristor valve is such that its globinscular density increases to a particular critical value, the effect is felt immediately by an embropheme called Duncan's Band and certain changes are instigated. This is the case even when there may not be any eolim currently in the vicinity of Duncan's Band.

Daerthropes may therefore affect a embropheme in a number of ways:
  • by direct external contact with the embropheme
  • by daerthropic reaction within the embropheme
  • by the embropheme detecting a specific change to the globinscular density of the daerthrope.
Although it is possible for some embrophemes to react to a daerthrope without having physical contact, two daerthropes can only react to each other when they physically meet. Daerthropic reactions do not usually occur within the globinscular region; they tend to take place within a specific embropheme, e.g. xebosynthesis occurs within the corlex rotunda.

As mentioned earlier, daerthropes can be divided into three categories. This depends upon the ability of a given daerthrope to move through the globinscular region. Some daerthropes are unable to enter the region at all — these are called aglobic daerthropes. Some can traverse the region without any problem — these are called autoglobic daerthropes. The third type of daerthrope — phlabaglobic — can also enter the globinscular region, but only carried by a minute embropheme called a phlabum. Phlaba will be discussed in more detail when the pendiphlabatic and dipendiphlabatic neulones are examined.

Globic Types of Daerthrope

A Autoglobic Able to traverse the globinscular region unaided by phlabum
B Phlabaglobic Needs a phlabum to traverse the globinscular region
C Aglobic Unable to traverse the globinscular region even with a phlabum

Like many parts of the fendument, the globinscular region is prone to change under certain circumstances. The most obvious of these changes is an aggravated remorph of the globinscular region — or argrination — which is a cumulative alteration to the physical structure of the matrix. This occurs periodically in that subset of the globinscular region that lies approximately half way along the length of the plaurioa, and more specifically around the corlex region.

Argrination prevents certain embrophemes from occupying that part of the globinscular region. As the argrination increases so does the “no-go” area, and the effect is to effectively repel these embrophemes from that part of the region. This effect is known as Argrinal Repulsion, and it is most noticeable on pendiphlabatic and dipendiphlabatic neulones, embrophemes that otherwise tend to be drawn towards each other. Argrination, and its negation, are caused by changes to Duncan's Band.

Enumerated Similarity States - 5: Quinessivity

Daerthropes can contain a number of base activant settings. Some of these have an Enumerated Similarity State Index Value (ESSIV) that determines how one daerthrope may be compared against another. The fifth of five settings under consideration here is:


Quinessivity

This is the fifth identified ESS. When a cruomative force establishes a vasque within a prelentic fendument, daerthropes with that have this ESS enabled have an effect upon sarpoids within the vasque.

The daerthrope(s) with the superior fifth ESS Index Value nullify those sarpoidal ethroceles imposed by subquinessive daerthropes.

Consequently, any metanolic resonance effect instigated by these subquinesisive daerthropes is cancelled within the vasque, irrespective of the location of the source daerthrope.

Nolarin, hidden within the kalim of the Y-body, has already been highlighted as superunessive to all other daerthropes within the periclentious fendument. We can now state that it is also superquinessive to other daerthropes, explaining why embrophemes in the nidroment are not affected via metanolic resonance.


Enumerated Similarity States - 4: Quessivity

Daerthropes can contain a number of base activant settings. Some of these have an Enumerated Similarity State Index Value (ESSIV) that determines how one daerthrope may be compared against another. The fourth of five settings under consideration here is:

Quessivity

Daerthropes that have this ESS activated are only affected if they are within an embropheme in contact with a vasque. The ESS does not have an effect in the globinscular region itself.

Where two particular daerthropes are within an embropheme for the purpose of undergoing a daerthropic reaction, the one with the superior ESSIV will take precedence.

For example, chysanthrone synthetase is superquessive to gylon concentrate within the corlex region, so if both daerthropes are present, chysanthrone synthesis would take place rather than xebosynthesis. Ebulons from the pendiphlabatic neulones are able to reach the corlex region as there is an enclosing vasque defined by a plauric attractor zone.


Enumerated Similarity States - 3: Triessivity

Daerthropes can contain a number of base activant settings. Some of these have an Enumerated Similarity State Index Value (ESSIV) that determines how one daerthrope may be compared against another. The third of five settings under consideration here is:

Triessivity

When a phlabaglobic daerthrope is awaiting issue from an embropheme, they use pectlions to communicate this state to the nearest unencumbered Generalised Phlaba (geph).

The pectlions will assign a geph to the daerthrope and the geph will seek out the daerthrope. Normally, each daerthrope will then be processed according to the order the gephs present themselves, until all phlabaglobic daerthropes in the same pectlionic group are processed.

However, when these daerthropes have this ESS activated, those with the most significant Index Value will take precedence over others. The relevant phlaba will pick up the daerthrope with the specific ESSIV, and leave the pectlion behind. (Note that any phlabaglobic daerthropes that do not have this ESS activated will not be affected by this ordering.)

Only when all daerthropes of this ESSIV have been processed will daerthropes with ESSIVs of lower significance be considered. This will continue until all daerthropes have been processed. Pectlions will then be able to react to new arrivals.

Note that the phlabaglobic daerthropes will all be processed in either situation. As such, triessivity is more significant where timing is an issue. Timing plays more of a part within chronomodular fenduments.


Enumerated Similarity States - 2: Diessivity

Daerthropes can contain a number of base activant settings. Some of these have an Enumerated Similarity State Index Value (ESSIV) that determines how one daerthrope may be compared against another. The second of five settings under consideration here is:

Diessivity

Daerthropes that have this ESS activated are only affected if they are within an embropheme in contact with a vasque. The ESS does not have an effect in the globinscular region itself.

Groups of daerthropes with the same or complementary ESSIV take precedence over those with an inferior Index Value.

To assist in understanding the concept of complementary ESSIVs,  one may think of a diessive pair of daerthropes having negative and positive Index Values. If a daerthrope with index values of -2 and +2 are within a relevant embropheme, those with indexes of +/-3, +/-4 would be excluded from the embropheme. Also a single daerthrope with an index value of 1 would be excluded provided that no daerthrope with an index of -1 was present, and vice versa.


Enumerated Similarity States - 1: Unessivity

Daerthropes can contain a number of base activant settings. Some of these have an Enumerated Similarity State Index Value (ESSIV) that determines how one daerthrope may be compared against another. The first of the five settings under consideration is:

Unessivity

Within a vasque, daerthropes that have an activated primary ESS are ranked so that only those with a superior Index Value may remain within that part of the globinscular region affected by the vasque. Note that this restriction only applies to autoglobic and phlabaglobic daerthropes within the globinscular region, not to daerthropes found within embrophemes.

Such daerthropes are superunessive to those with an inferior ESSIV.

All daerthropes encountered to date have this ESS.

The most obvious example of unessivity is within the nidroment. The nidroment is a vasque defined by the nidegral orb, which is an ebaschulent embropheme. Within the nidroment, part of the globinscular region extends into the nolar chain, and it is here the daerthrope nolarin is found. Nolarin is superunessive to all other daerthropes, so they are excluded from the nidroment.